The Lighthouse Hotel, Llandudno, United Kingdom

Providing panoramic views across the Irish Sea, the Lighthouse hotel is a wonderful maritime relic offering accommodation of a rather unusual nature.

Built in 1862, the Lighthouse warned the passing ships of the dangers of the North Wales coastline, offering safe passage for many a brave seaman.

These days the Lighthouse is more interested in its guests than the passing sailors, converted during its lifetime from a great beacon into a guesthouse.

The hotel resides on the rugged North Wales coast in the seaside resort of Llandudno. The nearest airport is Manchester International approximately 1.5 hours drive from the west.

Sat perilously atop the limestone cliffs, the Lighthouse towers over the Irish Sea some 100 meters, its fortress-like construction standing sentinel over the rushing waters deep below.

The hotel boasts three guestrooms, each commanding magnificent views. To the north rests the Isle of Man, and to the south sits Puffin Island.

With the beacon removed, the glass panelled lamp room is now a dramatic lounge for its guests, with striking panoramic views across the ocean.

The room is decorated early twentieth-century; its beautiful wooden chairs adorned with red upholstery and matching cushions, a wonderful throwback to the days when the building was more concerned with the safety of passing vessels.

By the window rests a small telescope, available to all who wish to seek the more modern frigates of today.

But the room really comes into its own of an evening. On a clear day the sunsets can be awe-inspiring, a romantic prelude to evening dinner.

A short walk will take you into the town of Llandudno. Popular with the British tourists, Llandudno is the quintessential seaside resort of the UK.

The ever popular amusement arcades keep the youngsters occupied while the adults can spend in the busy shopping streets.

Away from the tourist spots are some lovely walks atop the rugged cliffs. Inspiration maybe for a certain Lewis Carroll who wrote part of his ‘Alice In Wonderland’ around these here parts.

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